Sunday, July 16, 2006

Seeing where you are blind

"We begin with the premise that there could be many things about us which need to change, only some of which we are able to see at any given time."
To take inventory, to see where we are blind, is difficult. It takes several things.

First, it takes a willingness to be humble, a willingness to change where God feels we need to change, not where we want to change.

Second, it takes a belief that we still need to change, will always still need to change, to grow, learn and improve. That change is a permanent process, not a single goal.

Third, it takes desire sufficient that change is worth the effort and the cost.

If you have those three things, you can see where you are blind, and by pondering and paying attention, continue to improve yourself.

While there are many useful tools and methods and habits that aid us each in taking inventory, the important core is: will, belief and desire. With those three elements we will continue to overcome. Without all three elements, we will continue to be blind, not to hear, not to feel the guidance of God.

That is how to take inventory and to see where you are blind -- one of the topics that I've promised to visit.

There is more than this starting point (after all, it is all a starting point), but it starts with will, belief and desire.

6 comments:

annegb said...

This is a good topic and a very hard one, Stephen. I've done several fourth step inventories and it's so hard to see where I've gone wrong in situations.

Part of the problem is that sometimes, I'm not wrong LOL. Sometimes I'm trying to clean up somebody else's side of the street.

When my intentions are good, but my goal is self-defeating or controlling, it's really hard to see. Because I have only the best of intentions.

Eric Nielson said...

Nice thoughts.

I have been thinking about this a lot lately. There also seems to need to be a feeling of self worth doesn't there. Feeling like you are worth the effort.

I seem to be getting more introspective the older I get. Is that common? It seems to go against 'teaching an old dog new tricks' thinking.

Tigersue said...

This went well with what I was talking about on my blog. How we need to be humble and how do we do that on our own.

Tigersue said...

This went well with what I was talking about on my blog. How we need to be humble and how do we do that on our own.

Stephen said...

Part of the problem is that sometimes, I'm not wrong or sometimes you aren't wrong where you think you are.

That is an important lesson and part of listening, to realize that where you think you need to change and where God thinks you need to change may be different places.

And that you might be right sometimes.

John Anon said...

I think this is a powerful post, Stephen. It is so hard to be honest with ourselves. And being honest with yourself about your intentions may mean ascribing darker intentions to yourself than you really had.

I always find inventory frightening and enlightening. As I go over my past, I have to make decisions about why I did things that I am not sure that I am ready to make. I'm not sure that makes much sense actually. Oh well.